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The Victoria

A larger cousin of the FOUR-IN-HAND. Slightly less flamboyant than the PRINCE ALBERT. A narrow knot suited for point collars, and possibly collars with a high neck band. Also suited for older-style winged collars. Lengthens the neck. Suits ties with a soft, thin cloth.



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This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Prince Albert

Loved because of its resemblance to a flower’s calyx. Identical to the VICTORIA, except the cloth feeds through both passes at step g. Unique in that the final knot has a small lip of cloth peeking out from the bottom. Suits ties with soft, thin fabric. Good for short necks. Recommended with point collars and high collars.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Four-In-Hand

A small but slightly asymmetrical knot, known by most civilians. It’s simplicity makes it relatively kind to delicate silk. Especially good for heavy or embroidered ties. Best with point collars.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Cavendish

Essentially a doubled-up FOUR-IN-HAND, same in size as the WINDSOR. A larger yet narrow knot at home in both point and spread/cutaway collars. Devised by Messrs. Fink and Mao.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Half-Windsor

Larger than the FOUR-IN-HAND, but smaller than the WINDSOR. Reliable but aesthetically unremarkable; leave at home on a Saturday night! Good with heavier fabrics. Suits point collars—might get lost in a spread collar.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Dovorian, or Plattsburgh

A personal favorite for its beauty and versatility. Much preferable to a WINDSOR. A wasp-waisted, versatile knot with an inverted bell shape and a narrow opening. Devised by Kit Klinkert, Thomas Fink, and Yong Mao. Suits point or cutaway collars.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Windsor

Greater size and symmetry than the HALF-WINDSOR, but just as ubiquitous; best used as a contingency knot. Wide, triangular shape, best with lighter fabrics. Suits both point and spread collars. Duke of Windsor never used it.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Hanover

A symmetrical, overwrought HALF-WINDSOR that dwarfs a WINDSOR knot. Devised by Messrs. Fink and Mao. Use with spread/cutaway collar.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Balthus

Named after its bored inventor, the artist Balthus. Huge, wide knot that can be described as a DOVORIAN knot with some extra passes. Eats cloth like a fiend! Cutaway collars and long ties made of thin fabrics are just the thing for this leviathan.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


How to Tie an Ascot

Not an item or the faint of heart; however, for those who do not take themselves too seriously, it is a very comfortable alternative to a tie, and a warm alternative to a bare neck. A great casual solution for clammy evenings, best used in conjunction with a pervy moustache. A better way to say “debonair degenerate” has yet to be found by this author.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Cross Knot

I’ve yet to have success with this beauty, but others might be more dexterous than I. A knot originally used with 19c straight ties, but might work with narrower modern ties. Revived by Messrs. Fink and Mao. Final turn goes through both passes to achieve the “x” form.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The St. Andrew


Slightly larger than the HALF-WINDSOR, but slimmer and a bit off-center. Has an unassuming charm. Ideal for point collars.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Onassis


Named for its inventor Aristotle Onassis, this curiosity is a FOUR-IN-HAND with an extra turn at the end, in which the active end of the finished knot is brought back up and over, obscuring the knot. Best with collars with a spread that can amply house the unknotted cloth. Not fond of the effect, myself, but de gustibus, etc.



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


The Merovingian

The only worthwhile thing about the science fiction film in which it appeared. Use the thin end of the tie to execute this inverted, doubled-up WINDSOR. One tucks into the knot’s previous passes at the end. Socially precarious, given its origin, but every overweight, ponytailed virgin it encounters will find it quite “kew-wel.”



Or, click here to download.

This tutorial is graciously on loan to Duchess by the esteemed Lord Whimsy. We highly recommend checking out his blog and other resources.


All contents ©Duchess, Clothier 2014